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right now. >>> good wednesday, i'm carl quintanilla, jim cramer, david faber. a lot of corporate earnings today. some of them okay. some of them not so okay upon. implied open looks to be down again even as we had the so far this week the worst day of the year and then the second best day of the year. the volatility continuing today. europe's got some issues, as well. a lot of rampant rumors about various downgrades and a german bond auction that resulted on a record low of a ten-year of 128. our road map begin with the marks looking like it's time to put your hands up and as we prep for the second decline in this roller coaster. it's up and down for two drills, cat getting a double dose of negative comments. >> bank of america dragging down the rest of that sector after it did miss us and it's the only consolation. profits were four times higher than a year ago on cost-cuts and fewer bad loans. >> there's intel beating by a penny last night and expects current revenue, and the decline in pc sales. >> the second consecutive quarters in a row. display ads leads to revenue misses a
morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with jim cramer who is tasting mcdonald's new breakfast lineup which we'll talk about this hour. got a triple whammy of dow, dupont, trafrlers, utx pretty good as futures are on the rise. day of reckoning, some have said, netflix soaring after last night's results. in europe, weak pmis out of germany, china, too, but the european markets are pricing in higher expectations this morning for a rate cut from the ecb. our road map begins with users streaming internet flicks, the house of cards paying off for the company and shares skyrocketing for the company. is it too late to buy the stock. >> we're counting down to apple's earnings report and that will be after the close. the shares over the $400 mark. one way or the other. >> luxury not dead, at least not according to coach and we'll dig deeper into those numbers. >> u.s. airways and delta beating those numbers. >> not quite as sanguine. we'll take a look at the airline sector and talk about travel turbulence a bit, as well. >> definitely not comericcal. >> for the fir
korea. jim maseda joins us from seoul. hi, jim. >> reporter: hi, kelly. well, the past 24 hours have been a pretty good example of the unpredictability of kim junk union and his scene. after all of those signals, it turned out to be a very quiet day in north korea, focused entirely on those celebrations around founding father kim jong il's birthday. but then last night, there was a sudden new threat from the north korean military, which said it would strike south korea without warning if there were another anti-north protest in the south. so this was in reaction to a very small demonstration yesterday here in downtown seoul where a couple of effigies of kim jong un were burned. in the same message, he said the south must apologize for its undig phied acts before talks could happen. despite the angry ultimatum, there does seem to be a shift now towards what they call offramping or tamping down the volume and talking rather than confrontation. that said, those two medium range missiles are reportedly on their launchers in the eastern part of north korea ready to be fired. the south is
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
digital age. thank you. appreciate it. >> when we come back, we have jim cramer, stocks to watch and we'll talk about what has him fired up ahead of the opening bell. stick around. .. as soon as i met fiona and i was describing the problem we were having with our rear brakes, she immediately triaged the situation, knew exactly what was wrong with it, the car was diagnosed properly, it was fixed correctly i have confidence knowing that if i take to ford it's going to be done correctly with the right parts and the right people. get a free brake inspection and brake pads installed for just 49.95 after rebates when you use the ford service credit card. did you tell him to say all of that? no, he's right though... a lot can happen in a second. with fidelity's guaranteed one-second trade execution, we route your order to up to 75 market centers to look for the best possible price -- maybe even better than you expected. it's all part of our goal to execute your trade in one second. i'm derrick chan of fidelity investments. our one-second trade execution is one more innovative reason serious in
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
shrapnel designed to maim anyone standing by and jim avila has more. it's not hard to find out how to build one. >> reporter: it's not. investigators are learning more about the anatomy of the bombs and abc news confirming the common cooking appliance used in their construction was a midsize fager brand pressure cooker. unfortunately, the pot maker sells 50,000 a year of those in the united states. this is what remains of what investigators believe could be the crude but effective bomb used in boston. the american military knows them well. the pressure cooker bomb. homemade and designed to maim and kill. this video of military units detonating one in afghanistan posted on youtube. this one found on the internet from the streets of nepal. so common the department of defense handbook on spotting roadside bombs warns soldiers and marines to be on the lookout for that innocent pressure cooker and publications all over the internet teach the construction of a bomb made from mom's kitchen, why so popular? because pressure cookers seal so tightly and can be filled with nails and ball bearings and
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11